fbpx
Accessibility View
Open today from 10AM - 5PM
Open

Monday: Closed

Tuesday: Closed

Wednesday: 10AM - 5PM

Thursday: 10AM - 9PM

Friday: 10AM - 9PM

Saturday: 10AM - 5PM

Sunday: 10AM - 5PM

Loading Events

Birchbark Basket Making Workshop (Sold Out)

Join Remai Modern’s Lyndon J. Linklater as he facilitates a beginner birchbark basket making workshop. Linklater was taught how to work with birchbark by Ojibway Elders in Northwestern Ontario where he grew up. He witnessed and assisted in the making of birchbark canoes and baskets. 

This September 14 workshop is sold out, but you can still get tickets for the one on September 15!

$30 for members; $40 for non-members. This workshop is 18+. Capacity is limited so get your tickets for the Friday date!

Event/Exhibition meta autogenerated block.

Where

Cameco Learning Studio

In the past, First Nations communities utilized birchbark for many practical reasons, including transportation using birchbark canoes. Typically, canoes were smaller. However, during the fur trade era, birchbark canoes were made much larger to carry more goods. These canoes could easily be 40 feet long and six feet high, with capacity to carry up to five tons. It would take four men to portage with these huge canoes throughout the Canadian wilderness.

Birchbark was also used to make baskets. Different shapes and sizes of baskets were used for laundry, food, berry picking and many other purposes. Birchbark was also used to make art by birchbark biting.

About the instructor

Lyndon J Linklater is a traditional knowledge keeper and storyteller. He has an educational background in Indian Social Work, Indian Studies and some law. He is a citizen of the Thunderchild First Nation (Plains Cree) in Treaty 6 and has roots in Couchiching First Nation (Fort Francis, Ontario) in Treaty 3. Presently, Lyndon shares work with Remai Modern in Saskatoon as their Indigenous Relations Advisor, providing advice to their board and staff and delivering cultural programming. 
 
He is the longest serving member of the Office of the Treaty Commissioner’s Speakers’ Bureau, since he was appointed in 2000. Over the years, he has spoken to tens of thousands of people, delivering awareness and enlightenment on Treaty and First Nation worldview. 
 
He is a powerful storyteller who utilizes First Nation teachings that involve knowledge of ceremonies and mixes humour to deliver a poignant message. 

September 14 at 6:00PM 9:00PM